Things to do for Free

All Year Round Walks & Visits

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Walk: Leadon Valley Walks

Herefordshire and Gloucestershire

The Secret River publication comprises fourteen walks, all but one of which are circular and most of which are linked, providing ways of traversing the Leadon Valley from the source of the river to its confluence with the Severn. The publication is so named as this river avoids towns and even villages of any size. At Dymock three additional circular walks are met. These are Poets Paths I and I I (both 8 miles) and the Dymock Daffodil Way (10 miles).

Website: Visit Long Distance Walkers Association for details

Walk: Hereford Walk

Take a trek through Hereford's Norman heritage. Starting at the impressive Norman cathedral this walk guides you through the city's past taking in the castle moat and the Saxon wall.

Website: Visit BBC Hereford and Worcester for full details

Walk: Herefordshire Trail

A large circuit around the county visiting all the market towns, pretty villages and attractive countryside in between. Commons, woodlands, hills, farmlands, waterside and characteristic black and white architecture can all be enjoyed.

Website: Visit Ramblers website for details .

Walk: Shrewsbury Walk

This walk takes visitors through Norman Shrewsbury; from the Abbey to the Castle, via the town walls and a 12th century cellar - also taking in local Norman churches.

Website: Visit BBC Shropshire for full details .

Walk: Marches Way

A lengthy route linking Chester and Cardiff, two former Roman forts, through the borderlands of England and Wales. Includes numerous historic cities and towns such as Shrewsbury, Leominster and Abergavenny.

Website: Visit Go4awalk Website for details

Walk: Mortimer Trail

A walk through the Marches of England, taking in extensive forests, limestone tops and gentle pastures in an area dominated in medieval times by the Mortimer family, one of the most powerful Norman earldoms. It follows a succession of hills and ridges, crossing the valleys of the rivers Teme, Lugg and Arrow, with some strenuous climbs.

Website: Visit Long Distance Walkers Website for details

Walk: Glyndwr's Way

This scenic path through central Wales visits many sites associated with the 15th century hero Owain Glyndwr. The route is shaped roughly like a triangle, running from Welshpool southwest to Machynlleth before turning southeast to Knighton, with the third side of the triangle formed by Offas Dyke Path.

Website: Visit National Trail Website for details

Walk: Offa's Dyke Path

A route through the border country of England and Wales, from the Severn estuary to the Irish Sea via Knighton, Welshpool and Llangollen. Around 100km/60 miles of the route is alongside the 8th century earthwork of Offa's Dyke itself. There are a variety of beautiful landscapes including the limestone cliffs of the lower Wye valley, rolling farmlands, the Black Mountains, Shropshire Hills, Clywdian Hills and moorlands.

Website: Visit National Trails Website for details

Walk: Shropshire Way

This extensive tour of the county has some breathtaking views and includes the most celebrated countryside, combining bracing hill sections in one of the most rugged parts of the English midlands with gentler, more pastoral walking in the valleys.

The main route is a narrow and wiggling loop 224km/140-mile loop from Shrewsbury taking in the Shrewsbury Canal, Shropshire Hills, Bishop's Castle, Clun, Craven Arms, Ludlow, the Clee Hills, Wenlock Edge, the World Heritage Site at Ironbridge, the Wrekin and Wem. Here a 19km/12-mile northern spur connects with Whitchurch and Grindley Brook on the Llangollen Canal.

A shorter signed linear route, Wild Edric's Way, uses substantial sections of the Shropshire Way to link Church Stretton and Ludlow (79km/49 miles), and provides an alternative route through the Shropshire Hills including the Long Mynd and Kerry Ridgeway. The name commemorates a Saxon warrior at the time of William the Conqueror.

Website: Visit Shropshire Walking Website for details

Walk: Wye Valley Walk

An attractive route following the course of the river Wye via Monmouth, Hereford, Builth Wells and Rhayader to the source deep in rugged and remote Hafren Forest. The Walk crisscrosses the border of England and Wales, running along dramatic limestone gorges, through the rolling countryside of Herefordshire and into the uplands of mid Wales.

Website: Visit Wye Valley Walk Website for details

Walk: Shelve & the Stiperstones, from the Bog

This walk is in two contrasting sections. Firstly green rolling hills so typical of western Shropshire with a complete change of character in the final stages. Here the high ground offers superb views and tough going underfoot for those lacking decent boots! Adequate parking is available in the rather strangely named hamlet called "The Bog" (grid ref. SO357978). Formerly a thriving mine, there are a few remains which can be inspected with signage detailing the history.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Pole Bank from Carding Mill, Long Mynd

One of the most popular areas is the Long Mynd with the summit of Pole Bank (516 m - 1692 ft) forming a good excuse to explore the area. Basically a large plateau there are many deep valleys and these form a radial pattern into the moorland. Although the area is ideal for those wanting to make their first excursion into the hills navigation can be difficult and care is advised even in good weather.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Ragleth and the Long Mynd from Cardingmill Valley

The Long Mynd is a jewel in the crown of the Shropshire Hills. Its barren moorland and rounded, glacially formed hills form an area of glorious desolation in this beautiful county. This walk visits the outlying hill of Ragleth, from which there are some of the best views of the Long Mynd to be had anywhere. It then continues up Minton Hill onto the Mynd itself, visiting the summit of Pole Bank and then offering the choice of a longer or shorter excursion before descending the back to the stunning Cardingmill Valley.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Ratlinghope & the Stiperstones from the Knolls

The Stiperstones with their quartzite outcrops offer superb views over the surrounding countryside including the Long Mynd, Corndon Hill and mid-Wales. The summit of the ridge is the second highest point in Shropshire and more interesting than its competitors. Running north south the eastern flank consists of gentle slopes whilst to the west deep, steep sided valleys cut into the ridge to form great amphitheatres.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Herefordshire Beacon from British Camp car park

The Malvern Hills form an impressive line of summits, the highest point of which is the Worcestershire Beacon at the northern end of the range. Generally speaking the hills get lower as you go south. This short walk concentrates on the Herefordshire Beacon, which rises to 338 metres above sea level. Paths are well maintained and easy to follow.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: The Worcestershire Beacon

The Malvern Hills are a string of rounded summits stretching some 10km that are clearly visible from the M5 Motorway. Running in a line from north to south they form a ridge with the Worcestershire Beacon the highest summit (1394ft / 425m). To the west lies the County of Hereford with pleasant rolling countryside predominant whilst to the east lies the flood plain of the River Severn.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: The Malverns from the Gullet

This walk along the main ridge of the Malvern Hills visits both the Herefordshire and Worcestershire Beacons. On a good day the views across the surrounding are astounding.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: A Two Rivers Walk to Powick and Worcester

This completely flat walk follows the River Teme along its flood plain to Powick and then retraces to its confluence with the River Severn. From there it heads North along the West bank to the beautiful city of Worcester with its prominent Cathedral and returns along the East bank.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Leominster - a circular walk

A short walk from the Herefordshire town of Leominster which includes a section of the River Lugg and the opportunity to visit the fine church.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Shobdon Hill and Croft Ambrey

The North Western part of Herefordshire stands apart from the rural character of the majority of this county and takes on the feel of the Welsh hills less than 10 miles away. The walk makes extensive use of the Mortimer Trail and its subsidiary circular routes.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: High Vinnalls, Burrington and Richard's Castle Hamlet from Black Pool

A Herefordshire walk that explores the northern part of the county including High Vinnalls, Burrington and Richard's Castle Hamlet. The start is Black Pool on B4361.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: The Clee Hills from near Cleobury North

This walk visits the two summits that form the Clee Hills. Abdon Burf, the more northerly of the two is the highest hill in Shropshire. As such it offers some fine views over the surrounding countryside including the Long Mynd.

Website: Visit the Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Titterstone Clee Hill & Cleeton St. Mary from Cleehill

This walk visits the summit of Shropshire? second highest hill, crosses some wild moorland and also provides an opportunity to explore some of the industrial heritage associated with the once important granite quarrying industry. Starting from Cleehill village the route continues via Rouse Broughton Terrace to Titterstone. The walk continues up the Bitterley incline to the summit of Titterstone Clee Hill. The onward route continues via the small village of Cleeton St.Mary back to the start.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Stokesay Castle & View Edge

Stokesay Castle is a superb fortified manor and is a key feature of this Shropshire walk. The route also includes View Edge from where wide ranging views across pleasant Shropshire countryside can be enjoyed.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: A circular route from Clun

This Shropshire Walk from Clun includes parts of the Offa's Dyke National Trail, the Shropshire Way and the Jack Mytton Way. From Clun the route goes via Three Gates, Mardu, Bryndrinog, Spoad, Lower Spoad, Burfield and Llwyn back to the start.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: The Hergest Ridge from Kington

Starting from the Herefordshire town of Kington this walk explores the high ground of the Hergest Ridge. Using a section of the Offa's Dyke National Trail the walk also features some wonderful views across the Welsh Border country.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Marden & Sutton St.Nicholas from Moreton-on-Lugg

This Herefordshire walk starts from Moreton-on-Lugg and follows the River Lugg upstream to Marden. The walk continues via Sutton St.Nicholas and the Sutton Walls Iron Age Fort to the start

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Tillington from Moreton on Lugg

A Herefordshire walk that explores the pleasant rural scsne to the west of Moreton on Lugg. The route uses field paths for much of the way visiting the village of Tillington on the way

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: The Marcle Ridge from Much Marcle

This Herefordshire walk takes you along the crest of Marcle Ridge with views of the distant Malverns. The climb from Kynaston to Marcle Ridge provides the only real effort in an otherwise easy-paced ramble. Much Marcle church is very much worth a visit.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Abberley Hills - Worcestershire Way Circular

A straightforward short walk that largely follows one of the official Worcestershire Way circular routes. The highlights of this walk are the Norman church in the village of Abberley, the expanse of the Abberley ridge, the views out to the clock tower at Abberley School and quite possibly the Manor Arms pub! There are some great views across Worcestershire, but the ridge walk itself is largely wooded and secluded.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Woodbury and Abberley Hills from Great Witley

This walk boasts fantastic views of the Worcestershire countryside along one of the most spectacular sections of the Worcestershire Way (aside from the Malverns themselves) as well as the remote hill fort earthwork at Woodbury Hill.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Great Rhos & the Radnor Forest from New Radnor

Great Rhos and its neighbouring hills form the basis of this Mid-Wales walk from New Radnor. Generally unspoilt, the area offers some excellent walking and this route walks high above deep valleys offering some dramatic views.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Hay Bluff & Twmpa, Black Mountains

Hay Bluff and Twmpa are two popular objectives combined in the Brecon Beacons walk. This part of the National Park is more correctly known as the Black Mountains and this walk provides good walking and excellent views especially across the Wye Valley.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Cwmyoy & Hatterrall Hill from Llanthony Priory

This Brecon Beacons walk starts from Llanthony Priory and continues via Cwmyoy before ascending Hatterrall Hill. Offering a nice mix of valley and high level walking, this walk provides an excellent introduction to this area and the Brecon Beacons National Park as a whole.

Website: Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Walk: Wimperhill Wood and Longdon Orchard, Wyre Forest

The Wyre Forest with its Visitor Centre at Callow Hill and free car park at Hawkbatch offers easy guided walks via coloured posts to those with less time or inclination to strike out on their own initiative. This short walk, however, is one where you?e hardly likely to see more than a handful of people, even though there may be hoards within less than a mile of you! It is a delight at any time of year and if you?e quiet, you may even spot some deer.

Website:  Visit Walking Britain Website for details

Visit: Edvin Loach Old Church, Herefordshire

Ruin of a church dating back to the 11th century within the earthworks of a Norman motte and bailey castle. A new church built in 1860 stands next to the ruin.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Edvin Loach Old Church on the English Heritage website

Visit: Ewyas Harold Castle, Herefordshire

These earthworks are a well-preserved example of the motte-and-bailey configuration of many Norman castles.

Entry: Free

Website: Herefordshire Through Time website

Visit: Goodrich Castle, Herefordshire

Mid-12th century castle with one of the most complete sets of surviving medieval domestic buildings. An exhibition charts the castle's late-11th century origins to its fall in 1646.

Entry: There is an entrance fee. Please check the website for details.

Website: Goodrich Castle on the English Heritage website

Visit: Hereford Cathedral, Herefordshire

Norman remains include the choir, the south transept, the arch between the north transept and the choir aisle, and the nave arcade. The Mappa Mundi is a 13th century map of the world.

Entry: Free but a donation is suggested.

Website: Hereford Cathedral website

Visit: Longtown Castle, Herefordshire

Dating from the late 12th - early 13th century this ruined castle features an impressive round keep within a stone-built bailey.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Longtown Castle on the English Heritage website

Visit: Parish Church of St Mary and St David, Kilpeck, Herefordshire

Church with a typical nave, chancel and apse, built from about 1134 to 1145. It may incorporate some Saxon masonry. There are many surviving 12th century sculptures and a large Norman font.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Parish Church of St Mary and St David website

Visit: St Andrew, Bredwardine, Herefordshire

An early Norman church above the banks of the River Wye, restored in 1875. Notable features include an unusual "bend" in the nave towards the altar, a late-12th century font and tombs of knights.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Andrew, Bredwardine on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Bartholomew, Vowchurch, Herefordshire

Grade I listed church of Norman origin, altered and re-dedicated in 1348. East of the south porch is one small 12th century round-headed window.

Entry: Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Bartholomew on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Giles, Acton Beauchamp, Herefordshire

Small rural church from the 12th-15th centuries, mostly rebuilt in 1819. The south doorway is late Norman, with a carved 9th century stone reused as a lintel for the south door of tower.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Giles on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Guthlac, Little Cowarne, Herefordshire

12th century church dedicated to Guthlac, a saint connected with Hereford who died in 714. The Norman font is made up of a 12th century bowl and an old cider mill stone base.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Guthlac on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Mary, Fownhope, Herefordshire

Mainly 16th century church, though the central tower and east part of the nave are 12th century. A key feature is the Norman tympanum - or decoration above an arch - showing the virgin and child.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Mary on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Mary, Sarnesfield, Herefordshire

Grade I listed 12th century Norman church with a timber roof, a bell tower added about 1300 and the south chapel during the 14th century. Some medieval windows survive.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Mary on the English Heritage website

Visit: Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire

Founded 1135 by Roger de Clinton, this ruined Cistercian Abbey remains impressive. The Century church, tile-floored chapter house and the recently re-opened crypt can still be seen.

Entry: There is an entrance fee. Please check the website for details.

Website: Buildwas Abbey on the English Heritage website

Visit: Clun Castle, Shropshire

Ruins and extensive earthworks of a Welsh Border castle dating from the 11th century. The tall 13th century keep is unusually set into the side of the motte.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Clun Castle on the English Heritage website

Visit: Heath Chapel, Shropshire

Small, oblong church from the 12th century, with a typical Norman south door - the only decorated part of the outside. There is also a font and traces of wall painting from the time.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Heath Chapel website

Visit: Lilleshall Abbey, Shropshire

Extensive ruins of an abbey dating from the late 12th and early 13th centuries. Many other structures have been lost, their foundations partially recovered by archaeologists in the late 19th century.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Lilleshall Abbey on the English Heritage website

Visit: Ludlow Castle, Shropshire

Impressive, part-ruined castle first built in the 11th century, besieged during "the Anarchy" of the mid-12th century and converted into a royal palace in the 14th century.

Entry: There is an entrance fee. Please check the website for details.

Website: Ludlow Castle website

Visit: Shrewsbury Castle, Shropshire

Added-to and remodeled over the centuries, the oldest parts of the castle date from between 1066 and 1074. The castle contains the collections of the Shropshire Regimental Museum Trust.

Entry: There is an entrance fee. Please check the website for details..

Website: Shrewsbury Castle website

Visit: Shrewsbury Abbey, Shropshire

The Abbey was founded in 1083 and retains four of the massive drum-shaped columns from the original Norman church and fragments of the shrine of St Winefride, the 7th Century Welsh martyr.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Shrewsbury Abbey website

Visit: St Mary the Virgin, Whitton, Shropshire

Grade II* listed part-Norman church, with a Norman south doorway and squat tower. Roman brick can be seen used in the west end and nave. The east window is by Burne Jones and Morris.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Mary the Virgin on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Michael and All Angels, Onibury, Shropshire

This Norman church dates chiefly from the 12th century. Features include a chancel arch and crenellated tower. Small parts of medieval wall paintings also survive.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Michael and All Angels on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Peter and St Paul, Sheinton, Shropshire

Small rural church of mixed architecture dating back to the Norman period restored in 1845. In the nave, a small effigy of a recumbent female, perhaps a child, is probably from the 14th century.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Peter and St Paul on the English Heritage website

Visit: Wenlock Priory, Shropshire

Ruins of a priory including an extravagantly decorated chapter house from about 1140, its walls bedecked with blind arcading on multiple carved columns.

Entry: There is an entrance fee. Please check the website for details.

Website: Wenlock Priory on the English Heritage website

Visit: St John the Baptist, Hope Bagot, Shropshire

Grade 1 Norman church featuring a Norman chancel arch.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St John the Baptist, Hope Bagot on the English Heritage website

Visit: St John the Baptist, Kinlet, Shropshire

Grade I listed Norman church with later features and a Victorian half-timbered clerestory. The church contains a medieval chancery chapel.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St John the Baptist, Kinlet on the English Heritage website

Visit: St Bartholomew, Bayton, Worcestershire

Church dating from the mid-12th century, with a Norman arch over the south doorway. The circular font is a also from the mid-12th century, the bowl carved with beaded scroll and cable mouldings.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St Bartholomew on the English Heritage website

Visit: St John the Baptist, Eldersfield, Worcestershire

Grade II listed Norman church with Norman chancel arch.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: St John the Baptist on the English Heritage website

Visit: Worcester Cathedral, Worcestershire

Cathedral dating from the 12th and 13th centuries with an 11th century crypt. The chapter house dates from 1120. The cathedral includes the tomb of King John.

Entry: Free, but check website for opening times.

Website: Worcester Cathedral website